The BarnManager Q&A With: Samantha Lyster

The BarnManager Q&A With:

Samantha Lyster, Head Groom at Artemis Equestrian Farm, located in Wellington, FL, and Greenwich, CT

What are three things that are always in your ring bag?

I always have a leather hole punch, a pair of scissors, and Band-Aids. They seem a little silly, but they are the things I’m most often asked for at the ring, both by the people I work for and by other grooms who don’t have them handy.

What is the most helpful habit that you practice at the barn?

Patience. It is still something I struggle with, and it is often easy to forget. It can be applied in all situations, with both horses and humans.

Samantha Lyster with her own Dame Amour. Photo by Ashley Neuhof Photography

How do you foster a great team environment in your business?

This can be difficult unless you’re lucky enough to have a group of people that get along instantly. I think it is important to keep everyone informed of the day’s plan, even if it doesn’t necessarily apply to them, because it keeps the whole team feeling involved. Also, make sure to be aware of how everyone does things a little differently and make an effort to include their ideas.

What’s your best tip or hack for grooming and horse care? Where did you learn it?

If you think you’ve curried enough you haven’t, and you should keep going. Also, try to use different types of curry combs. The best way to get a horse to shine is to really stimulate their skin, get those natural oils working to your advantage, and remove all that dead hair and dirt. I learned that from my coworker, Jose Rios. He also pointed out the importance of having multiple curry combs like a mitt, a thick rubber one, and a metal one. They all have their own job.

 What is your favorite equestrian competition and why?

I’ve only been once, but I really liked Lake Placid. The show itself had a great atmosphere, and the town was super neat. The surrounding areas had lots of places to explore!

If you were a horse, what would you be and why?

If I were a horse, I would probably be someone’s quarter horse they trail ride. I really like to be out and about and explore new areas and sights!

Have questions about utilizing BarnManager or want to give it a try for yourself? Request a live demo here!

BarnManager is designed to be a part of your team, with the compatibility and credentials necessary to improve communication, simplify the management of horses, and get you out of the office, off the phone calls, and into the barn with the horses you care about! Click here to get a free demo and find out more!

Five Tips for a Shiny Summer Coat

As an equestrian, nothing beats someone telling you that your horse has a beautiful coat. Now that spring is here and horses are beginning to shed out, it is time to start thinking about how to get their coat looking healthy and shiny for the summer. Keep reading for a few of BarnManager’s favorite tips for a fantastic summer coat.

1. Groom Properly

One of the easiest and cheapest ways to give your horse a shiny coat is to groom them properly. This is especially important if they were not clipped during the winter and are shedding out. Grooming your horse is not only good exercise and helpful for their coat, but it also gives you time to check for any new bumps or scratches. Start with currying your horse, which loosens all the dirt and dead hair and brings out the natural oils. This step is essential for a healthy-looking coat. Next, use a hard brush to get all of the dirt and dead hair off of your horse and also distribute the oils. Going over your horse afterwards with a towel will grab any dirt or dust that was left behind and ensure that your horse’s coat is lying flat. It is also important to clean your grooming tools regularly because dirt builds up quickly, and you do not want to spread it while brushing your horse.

2. Good Diet

A shiny coat often starts from within. A balanced diet is key to making sure your horse has a gleaming coat this summer. It is important to feed good hay that has a nice green color and is not dried out or dusty. Hay is an extremely important part of a horse’s diet because it provides nutrients. Adding supplements into your horse’s feed can also be beneficial. For example, Vitamin E and selenium are two supplements that can help your horse’s coat. If you are not sure your horse has a balanced diet or is getting proper nutrients, consider talking with a nutritionist.

3. Do Not Over Bathe

When it gets warmer it is easy to bathe horses too frequently, especially if they are grey. While it may seem like a good idea to keep them clean, it can dry out their skin and coat. Also, legs that are are not dried properly can be susceptible to scratches and other skin conditions. If your horse does get warm after exercise, try sponging and toweling off where they are sweaty or putting fans in front of them so they dry faster. For owners of grey horses, spot removers are useful for removing stained areas without doing a full bath. If you must bathe your horse during the hot months of summer, consider using conditioner instead of shampoo. This will help moisturize the coat instead of drying it out. When applying, avoid the saddle area as this will make it very slippery. Also, do not put conditioner in the mane or tail if you plan on braiding your horse for a competition in the near future.

4. Protect From the Sun

During the spring, summer, and early fall a horse’s coat can often get sun bleached from being turned out, especially if the paddock is not well-shaded. This can be solved by either doing night turnout or getting a fly sheet to protect your horse from the sun as well as flies. A fly sheet may also help keep your horse a little cleaner so you can avoid daily baths.

5. Invest in a Coat Shine Product

To add a little extra gleam to your horse’s coat, purchase a coat shine product. There are many options that can help make your horse’s coat soft, shiny, and healthy. These sprays often contain conditioner that moisturizes the coat. Make sure to check the ingredients and avoid any products containing silicone, which can actually dry out the coat. Similar to applying conditioner during a bath, be careful about avoiding the area where the saddle goes.

Whether or not you plan on showing, a beautiful, healthy, and shiny coat is something that all horse owners can achieve. Test out these tips this spring to get your horse’s coat looking its best.

Have questions about utilizing BarnManager or want to give it a try for yourself? Request a live demo here!

BarnManager is designed to be a part of your team, with the compatibility and credentials necessary to improve communication, simplify the management of horses, and get you out of the office, off the phone calls, and into the barn with the horses you care about! Click here to get a free demo and find out more!

The BarnManager Q&A With: Lindsey Bailey

The BarnManager Q&A With:

Lindsey Bailey, Groom at Louisburg Farm, located in Wellington, FL, and Boston, MA

What are three things that are always in your ring bag?

I always have water, horse cookies, and a towel.

What is the most helpful habit that you practice at the barn?

Keep it simple and build a program with purpose. At the end of the day, they’re horses and they need to be horses. This means letting them roll and be dirty or giving them opportunities to buck and shake their heads. I’m also a huge believer that a good feeding program, a great farrier, and a knowledgeable vet make grooming horses a simple and straightforward job.

Photo by Jump Media

How do you foster a great team environment in your business?

Always be willing to lend a hand and always be ready to learn something new.

What’s your best tip or hack for grooming and horse care? Where did you learn it?

Listen to your horses and they’ll tell you what they need. I’ve learned a lot about horses from my mom. She’s an amazing horsewoman and has always been great at opening my eyes to how horses think and how their bodies work in a way that you really don’t find in the show world. My sister and I grew up riding our ponies with halters and lead ropes in the fields they lived in and taking care of them ourselves. I had no idea having a groom was even an option. My mom is incredible, and she is constantly seeking out new knowledge. What I’ve learned and continue to learn from her has always been the foundation of my grooming.

What is your favorite equestrian competition and why?

I had the opportunity to groom at World Equestrian Center – Ocala a couple of times this season, and I don’t think any other show really compares to it. The facility is designed intuitively, it is so easy to work out of, and the crowds are amazing. The atmosphere on Saturday nights is unreal.

If you were a horse, what would you be and why?

I would like to say I would be a laidback, super-chill quarter horse, but in reality, I’m probably more of a high-strung dressage horse that’s a total perfectionist, and the grooms draw straws to take care of.

Have questions about utilizing BarnManager or want to give it a try for yourself? Request a live demo here!

BarnManager is designed to be a part of your team, with the compatibility and credentials necessary to improve communication, simplify the management of horses, and get you out of the office, off the phone calls, and into the barn with the horses you care about! Click here to get a free demo and find out more!

Why Did You Become a Barn Manager?

Kelly Campbell

Manager for Eight Oaks Farm Inc., based in Middleburg, VA, and Wellington, FL

What is the story behind you becoming a barn manager?

Photo courtesy of Kelly Campbell

I went to Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, NY, and grew up just 30 minutes away. I was on the IHSA team and fully immersed in the riding program. When everyone else would go home for breaks or for the summer, I lived close enough that I continued to ride at school full time. My coaches (Cindy Ford, Belinda Colgan, and Karen Hurff) were always kind enough to let me show one of the school’s horses, and I worked off my show bills. Even during the summer, we still had a barn of around 40 horses that needed care. I did a lot of horse care, turning out, rehabbing horses, and —honestly—a ton of laundry. When we would go to shows, I would do basic grooming duties, stall cleaning, getting horses ready for the ring, etc. As the summers went by, they gave me more responsibilities.  The college required my coaches to take time off during the summer, so I was always there to help when they were away. These years were when I realized that horses were all I wanted to do. After college, I started off as a groom and slowly worked my way up through different jobs to where I am now, the barn manager at Eight Oaks Farm Inc. for Johnny and Kitty Barker.

What is your favorite part about being a barn manager?

My favorite part of being a barn manager by far is the horses. I can’t even think of what another answer could be! I am very lucky to work with a great group of horses at Eight Oaks.  It is so rewarding to get to know each horse, figure out what keeps them happiest, and watch them succeed.

 

Krista Goosens

Manager for Brianne Goutal LLC and the Propp Family, based in Wellington, FL, and Long Island, NY

What is the story behind you becoming a barn manager?

Photo by Giana Terranova Photography

I rode competitively as a junior and as an amateur through college and grad school. After school, I worked a corporate 9-to-5 job in alternative energy. While I found my job interesting, I hated the lifestyle, and I really missed the horses. I had almost no free time for riding, and sitting in an office every day just wasn’t for me. I reached out to some old friends in the horse industry, and someone connected me with Jill Shulman at Back Country Farm. She happened to be looking for a new manager/assistant trainer at the time, and everything fell into place very quickly. I started with the Shulmans in the fall of 2012 and haven’t looked back!

What is your favorite part about being a barn manager?

My favorite part of being a barn manager is definitely seeing the progression of horses and riders over time. I love getting a new horse into the barn and seeing how they change and develop. I’ve been working with Brianne Goutal and the Propp family for about three and a half years now, and I’m very proud of the fact that our program prioritizes the horses’ health and happiness above all else. We really try to take our time to get to know each horse and what works or doesn’t work for them in a competitive program. Some need more structured flatwork and fitness regimes every day, while some prefer a more laid-back approach. I really enjoy seeing how the horses thrive in our barn and how the kids grow with them and develop as riders. I feel very fortunate to be able to work with such amazing animals, and seeing them win at the highest level never gets old.

 

Kiira Lizza

Manager for Grafton Ridge, based in South Salem, NY, and Wellington, FL

What is the story behind you becoming a barn manager?

Photo courtesy of Kiira Lizza

I’ve been involved with horses my entire life and have always been very passionate about horse care. I was lucky enough to grow up as a working student for Nona Garson, which gave me a taste of the top level of the sport at a young age. After graduating from Skidmore College, I went on to work for Anne Kursinski, Amanda Steege, and Leslie Howard grooming, managing, and riding up to the five-star level. I took a break from horses in 2017 and worked in corporate America. I moved to England in 2019 to earn my MBA from Warwick Business School. After graduating with another corporate job, COVID forced the company to close down. I was in Wellington at the time, so I started freelance working with horses again. A friend was working for Michael Delfiandra and Vanessa Roman at Grafton Ridge, and they happened to be looking for a barn manager. The rest is history!

What is your favorite part about being a barn manager?

My favorite part is the horses! I love treating each one of our horses as if they were my own. I love learning different ways to make the horses happier and healthier in their day-to-day lives and in their jobs. A close second would be working for Michael Delfiandra and Vanessa Roman. They have been an amazing pair to work for, and I feel lucky to be a part of their business. I think it is really important to find professionals that respect your expertise and time. Being a barn manager—especially at this upper level of the sport—can feel like a 24/7 job, so it’s important that the people you’re working for acknowledge the time and effort you are putting into their business. I’m very fortunate to be part of such a great team.

Have questions about utilizing BarnManager or want to give it a try for yourself? Request a live demo here!

BarnManager is designed to be a part of your team, with the compatibility and credentials necessary to improve communication, simplify the management of horses, and get you out of the office, off the phone calls, and into the barn with the horses you care about! Click here to get a free demo and find out more!

Five Tips To Stay Organized During a Busy Horse Show Day

Horse show days can be extremely hectic and overwhelming. The key to success during those types of days is staying organized. Read some of BarnManager’s tips to tackle a busy day at any competition.

1. Make a Plan

The first step in staying organized during a busy horse show day actually happens the afternoon or night before. If you know you are going to have a day with lots of horses and clients showing, take time to make a plan the day before. Many barns write out the schedule on a whiteboard. This way all trainers, grooms, managers, and riders are aware of what the day will look like. Ideally, this schedule includes what ring each horse shows in and an approximate time the horse should be at the ring ready to go. Noting the name of the class is helpful if the horse shows in both the hunters and equitation and requires different equipment for each discipline. Deciding who will take care of each horse and bring it to the ring can also make the plan run efficiently throughout the busy show day. Including orders of go for classes, when available, is another useful piece of information that can help keep everyone on time.
(Did you know? BarnManager has a virtual whiteboard feature so everyone can see the schedule while up at the ring and make or view any adjustments!)

2. Organize Equipment

Setting out equipment needed for each horse beforehand can save a lot of time throughout the day. If each horse’s saddle, bridle, martingale, girth, saddle pad, and number are neatly piled together, you do not have to worry about a horse arriving to the ring with the wrong equipment or an employee being late because they could not find the correct boots. It takes a few extra minutes to organize the night before or in the morning, but it will save time and energy once the day has started.

3. Be Flexible

Horse shows are known for not always running on time and horses themselves can often be unpredictable. For these reasons, you have to be able to be flexible in your plan. If a ring is running late or one of the horses pulls a shoe before a class, you must be able to alter your schedule quickly in order to deal with the last-minute changes. Last-minute adjustments in a well-thought-out plan can be overcome with a little patience, flexibility, teamwork, and good problem-solving skills.

4. Communication

Effective communication is always a necessity in a barn, especially during a hectic horse show day. The only way that all employees will know and understand the plan is through communication. Also, if something changes, everyone must be told of the alterations so the day can continue to run smoothly. Constant and clear communication throughout the day is important so everyone stays up to date. Many barns use group texts or walkie-talkies so that all staff members are updated about changes at the same time.

5. Checklist

Creating a checklist to go through at the end of the day is a great way to make sure all tasks were completed. This checklist can include specific aftercare for the horses, making feed, any tack alterations for the next day, and making sure all equipment was clean and properly put away. Make a specific checklist for each show day and add items to it as you go. Take time at the end of the day to review and fine-tune your plan for the next day.
(Did you know? BarnManager has a list feature so you can make a daily checklist. You can also share this checklist with your team at a show!)

While horse showing can be stressful and exhausting, especially on busy days, the most important tip is to remember to have fun and enjoy the successful moments both in and out of the ring.

Have questions about utilizing BarnManager or want to give it a try for yourself? Request a live demo here!

BarnManager is designed to be a part of your team, with the compatibility and credentials necessary to improve communication, simplify the management of horses, and get you out of the office, off the phone calls, and into the barn with the horses you care about! Click here to get a free demo and find out more!

The BarnManager Q&A With: Abigail Fulmer

The BarnManager Q&A With:

Abigail Fulmer, Head Groom/Barn Manager for Lynn Symansky Equestrian, located in Middleburg, VA

Abigail Fulmer and Lynn Symansky at the Ocala Jockey Club International Three-Day Event.

 

What are important items that are always in your ring bag?

In my ring bag, I always have a hoof pick, rubber bands, pins, and a leather hole punch.

What is the most helpful habit that you practice at the barn?

I always make a to-do list. When you work in a fast-paced performance barn, you are always having to multitask and end up doing several jobs at once, so it is very easy to overlook or forget to do something. This is why I always make a list for myself, either on the whiteboard or I make a note in my phone. This helps me make sure that everything gets done in the most efficient way possible and that I do not forget anything.

(Did you know? BarnManager’s app has a helpful list feature so you can make your daily to-do lists with your team at the barn!)

How do you foster a great team environment in your business?

Communication. In my experience, most tension and struggles between people working together come from a lack of communication. For this reason, I think effective communication should be a priority in a barn.

Abigail Fulmer enjoying some downtime at a horse show.

What’s your best tip or hack for grooming and horse care? Where did you learn it?

For horses with dry skin or sensitive skin, apple cider vinegar is your best friend. Dilute it in a bit of warm water and it will work wonders on hives or dry skin. I learned this trick from Lynn’s previous groom that I had the pleasure of overlapping with for a few months as I was getting started in the business.

What is your favorite equestrian competition and why?

My favorite event so far has been Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event. It is such a beautiful facility and a hub for people from all over the world to come together to compete and enjoy the sport.

If you were a horse, what would you be and why?

I would be a Shetland pony because even though I may be tiny I can still hold my own with the massive warmbloods in our program!

Have questions about utilizing BarnManager or want to give it a try for yourself? Request a live demo here!

BarnManager is designed to be a part of your team, with the compatibility and credentials necessary to improve communication, simplify the management of horses, and get you out of the office, off the phone calls, and into the barn with the horses you care about! Click here to get a free demo and find out more!

BarnManager’s Grooming Necessities

There are several important products and tools that should be in every groom box and ring bag to ensure a clean and shiny horse at the barn and during competition. Keep reading for some of BarnManager’s grooming essentials for at home and in the show ring.

Groom Box Supplies

Most Important Items

Your grooming box at home should have all the necessary tools you need to thoroughly clean your horse. To begin, make sure you have a hoof pick, curry comb, hard brush, soft brush, and mane-and-tail brush. Hoof picks should be used before and after you ride to ensure there are no rocks or objects stuck in your horse’s hooves and to remove footing and dirt. For curry combs, there are several different options; some prefer a mitt while others like to use a regular rubber one. The style does not matter as long as you are able to successfully remove dirt and old hair. Having two different types of brushes is helpful because a hard brush is perfect for getting dirt or mud off of your horse’s legs, and a soft brush is great to use on the face. While many people do not brush their horse’s tail every day in order to help to keep it full, having a mane-and-tail brush or comb is good to have to gently remove tangles or debris.

Once you add brushes into your grooming box, the next step is to make sure you have a towel, tail detangler, and fly spray. Towels are always handy for wiping down a horse after brushing them. A towel can catch any leftover dirt and add a little extra shine. A tail detangler is a definite necessity to brush a tail without pulling too much of it out. Fly spray may not be needed during the colder months, but it is definitely important in the summer and if you travel to warmer climates in the winter.

Extra Small Items

Lastly, your grooming box should have scissors, wound cream, and rubber bands. Scissors are nice to have close by for trimming a mane. You may also use them to cut off extra Velcro on a polo, remove a tag from a new saddle pad, or to trim the ends of your horse’s tail. Horses tend to get scrapes and nicks easily, so having a wound cream is essential. Rubber bands are a useful tool to keep on hand for braiding over an unruly mane. Also, if a keeper breaks on a bridle, a rubber band can be a good temporary fix.

Click here for a checklist

 

Ring Bag Supplies

Most Important Items

Several components of your groom box are also tools that you should keep in your ring bag. For example, a hoof pick, scissors, hard brush, towel, and mane-and-tail brush are necessities for a quick clean-up before entering the show ring. You never know when you might need a hoof pick or pair of scissors at the last minute. For this reason, having them in your bag is key. A brush can be useful for cleaning off the footing or dirt on a horse’s legs. A towel can be used to clean off the rider’s boots as well as the horse’s mouth. Quickly brushing through a horse’s tail can help maintain their picture-perfect look in the ring, especially for the hunters.

Fly spray, a tail detangler, and wound cream can also be put in your ring bag, along with baby powder, hoof oil, and baby wipes. It’s good to have fly spray and a tail detangler nearby when you are at the ring. Fly spray is very important to have in the summer heat when the flies are bad. Horses can often nick themselves or grab themselves in the schooling area. For this reason, you should try to have a wound cream close by. Baby powder is a great product for whitening socks before a hunter hack or model. Hoof oil should be applied right before a horse walks into the ring. Baby wipes are perfect for quick touch-ups to ensure a clean look.

Extra Small Items

The last few small items that should be kept in a ring bag are safety pins, a hole punch, boot polish, rubber bands, zip ties, and duct tape. Safety pins hold a jumper’s number in place on a saddle pad can sometimes come loose, so extras are helpful. A hole punch can come in handy for last-minute tack adjustments. Your rider will appreciate you having boot polish if their boots get extra muddy or they run out. Rubber bands are great for fixing a jumper braid. They can also serve as a quick fix for broken tack, along with zip ties. Duct tape can be useful to have if a horse pulls a shoe at the ring.

In order to make sure that your whole team knows what to bring to the ring, you can use BarnManager’s list feature to create a checklist of all necessary grooming supplies for a ring bag.

Click here for a checklist

Depending on the level, discipline, and type of barn you work for there may be other important items to consider, but the supplies above are the core tools that can ensure your horse will be looking its best at home and in the show ring.

Have questions about utilizing BarnManager or want to give it a try for yourself? Request a live demo here!

BarnManager is designed to be a part of your team, with the compatibility and credentials necessary to improve communication, simplify the management of horses, and get you out of the office, off the phone calls, and into the barn with the horses you care about! Click here to get a free demo and find out more!

The BarnManager Q&A With: Nicole Baergen

The BarnManager Q&A With:

Nicole Baergen, Groom and Manager for Jan Brons Dressage, located in Wellington, FL

Nicole Baergen and Glen Emeril competing. Photo by Barbara Foose

What are three things that are always in your ring bag?

I always carry fly spray, towels, and a hoof pick with me to the ring.

What is the most helpful habit you practice at the barn?

I think it is important to pick horses’ feet before leaving their stall to keep the aisle clean and neat. I also believe that all equipment and grooming supplies should have a “home” or specific spot where they are stored. It is helpful for people to know where to put things after they use them, so things don’t pile up at the end of the day.

How do you foster a great team environment in your business?

I try to schedule group activities outside of the barn. It gets everyone excited and looking forward to doing something together. I actually use Groupon a lot because it’s a great way to find local things to do. Plus, it’s easy on everyone’s budget.

Nicole Baergen and Chichic enjoying some downtime at the Central American and Caribbean Games in 2018.

What’s your best tip or hack for grooming and horse care? Where did you learn it?

I love my tails. I’m big on conditioning and trimming them weekly. Also, currying is so important. I love my metal curry to massage the body. I then use a rubber curry to get the legs and the in-between places. I learned these grooming tricks when I was in high school and spent a summer as a working student for Nancy Later. She was a stickler for the details. I’m so grateful to have had her guidance, which helped lay the foundation for me to be doing what I do now.

What is your favorite equestrian competition and why?

I love them all. I don’t think I could pick one. I enjoy being able to constantly meet so many people and learn from them at different shows. Plus, I have had the pleasure of working with some amazing horses.

If you were a horse, what would you be and why?

A Shetland pony! I may be small, but I’m mighty.

 

Have questions about utilizing BarnManager or want to give it a try for yourself? Request a live demo here!

BarnManager is designed to be a part of your team, with the compatibility and credentials necessary to improve communication, simplify the management of horses, and get you out of the office, off the phone calls, and into the barn with the horses you care about! Click here to get a free demo and find out more!

Five Qualities That Make a Good Barn Manager

Barn managers are a key component to running a successful barn. Keep reading to learn about some of the essential traits of a good barn manager.

1. The Ability to Multi-Task

Barn managers must be able to handle switching between several different tasks in a short period of time. They have to know how to prioritize their projects so the most important tasks are done quickly and efficiently. A medical emergency might happen right when a manager is in the middle of packing for a horse show, so they must know how to change gears and attend to the more important job without losing track of other things. It is also necessary for managers to balance several activities at once, keeping each one on track throughout a busy day. For example, managers often need to build the schedule for the next day while also helping the visiting vet, ordering grain, getting the rides done, or checking in with other staff.

2. Planning Ahead

Managers have to be two steps ahead of everyone else. For this reason, the ability to make both long-term and short-term schedules is critical. For long-term scheduling, managers should know key dates such as when horse show entries are due, which weeks the farrier is coming, and when health papers are needed. Knowing when each horse is scheduled for various procedures is a lot to keep straight, but it is the manager’s job to know when a client inquires.

At horse shows, the ability to make daily short-term schedules is essential. Managers are responsible for knowing which groom is taking each horse to the ring, making sure every horse has the right equipment, and being sure that all the correct aftercare is done. This requires managers to be able to plan out each day almost to the minute.

3. Communication Skills

Managers must effectively communicate with all staff members as well as clients, vets, farriers, and more. During a busy day, especially at a horse show, clear communication is crucial. Managers need to be positive that grooms, clients, riders, and trainers are all on the same page and understand the plan. Additionally, if the plan changes, managers are often in charge of making sure everyone is aware of the alterations.

When talking with coworkers, it is very helpful to keep a positive attitude. Managers are seen as the leaders. If they have a negative attitude, it will most likely transfer to other employees. If a problem arises between two coworkers, barn managers need to know how to remain calm, listen to both sides, and work with each employee to come up with a solution.

In order to successfully communicate and work with vets and farriers, managers must understand basic horse knowledge. It is their job to tell the vet or farrier what is going on with the horse when there is an issue. They are often responsible for relaying the diagnosis or treatment plan to the trainer, rider, and client.

4. An Open Mind

For most jobs in the equestrian industry, having an open mind is key. Even if someone has been a manager for 10 years, there is always something new they can learn. Every horse has something to teach, and coworkers also have new tips or tricks that are helpful. Having a positive attitude and always being willing to learn can help managers constantly improve their skills.

5. Love of the Horse

The most necessary quality in a good barn manager is to love the horses. The job requires long hours and can be physically and mentally tiring. A commitment to the animals makes it all worth it. A manager that has a passion for horses will always be fully committed to the job and make sure the horses’ care comes first.

Barn managers may not always be the ones riding and training. Their dedication to the barn behind the scenes allows for happy, healthy, and successful horses and riders.

Have questions about utilizing BarnManager or want to give it a try for yourself? Request a live demo here!

BarnManager is designed to be a part of your team, with the compatibility and credentials necessary to improve communication, simplify the management of horses, and get you out of the office, off the phone calls, and into the barn with the horses you care about! Click here to get a free demo and find out more!