Equestrian-Related Activities To Do This Mother’s Day

Horse moms are there for early morning horse shows, good rides, bad rides, and everything in between, which is why they deserve a special Mother’s Day. Plan a perfect horse-themed Mother’s Day this year with some of the suggestions below.

Go for a Trail Ride

A Mother’s Day trail ride is a great way to enjoy the beautiful spring weather. Horse moms look forward to relaxing during this holiday, so a trail ride is a perfect activity. It’s also always nice for both horses and riders to get out of the arena. You can even invite a group of your barn’s horse moms to go out on the trail together.

Plan a Picnic at the Barn

Treat your horse mom to a special lunch at the barn. Pick a quiet spot around the barn and pack a few of her favorite foods so she can enjoy a great meal surrounded by horses. You can either make the food yourself, or order from her favorite close-by restaurant. Or go big and organize a potluck lunch for all the horse moms and your barn featuring easy-to-serve food and of course a cake!

Go to a Tack Shop

Equestrians love spending hours at a tack shop browsing through all of the clothes and equipment. Since buying a gift for horse moms can be a difficult task, take her to your local tack shop for a mini shopping spree and let her choose a present.

Stage a Photography Session

Plan a photography session with your mom and her favorite horse. Even if you do not have professional camera equipment, iPhones can take great photos with proper editing. All you have to do is give her horse a bath, pick a spot with a nice background, and start taking photos. This can be a fun way to celebrate your mom, and if you print the photos and put them in a frame it also makes a great keepsake gift.

Relax and Watch a Fun Class

There are several horse shows taking place on Mother’s Day that could be fun to attend if you are close by. Relaxing and watching some of the bigger classes on the weekend is always an enjoyable and exciting way to spend the day. If you are not near any horse shows, there are a few live streams covering big events around the world. There are also several horse shows that are on demand, so you can watch a past event together as well. Whip up some yummy snacks and beverages and spend the day watching your favorite discipline.

Click Here for a List of May Live Streams.

Make a Day of It

Go above and beyond this year for Mother’s Day by planning an entire day filled with several of these equestrian-related activities that she is guaranteed to love.

Have questions about utilizing BarnManager or want to give it a try for yourself? Request a live demo here!

BarnManager is designed to be a part of your team, with the compatibility and credentials necessary to improve communication, simplify the management of horses, and get you out of the office, off the phone calls, and into the barn with the horses you care about! Click here to get a free demo and find out more!

Five Tips for a Shiny Summer Coat

As an equestrian, nothing beats someone telling you that your horse has a beautiful coat. Now that spring is here and horses are beginning to shed out, it is time to start thinking about how to get their coat looking healthy and shiny for the summer. Keep reading for a few of BarnManager’s favorite tips for a fantastic summer coat.

1. Groom Properly

One of the easiest and cheapest ways to give your horse a shiny coat is to groom them properly. This is especially important if they were not clipped during the winter and are shedding out. Grooming your horse is not only good exercise and helpful for their coat, but it also gives you time to check for any new bumps or scratches. Start with currying your horse, which loosens all the dirt and dead hair and brings out the natural oils. This step is essential for a healthy-looking coat. Next, use a hard brush to get all of the dirt and dead hair off of your horse and also distribute the oils. Going over your horse afterwards with a towel will grab any dirt or dust that was left behind and ensure that your horse’s coat is lying flat. It is also important to clean your grooming tools regularly because dirt builds up quickly, and you do not want to spread it while brushing your horse.

2. Good Diet

A shiny coat often starts from within. A balanced diet is key to making sure your horse has a gleaming coat this summer. It is important to feed good hay that has a nice green color and is not dried out or dusty. Hay is an extremely important part of a horse’s diet because it provides nutrients. Adding supplements into your horse’s feed can also be beneficial. For example, Vitamin E and selenium are two supplements that can help your horse’s coat. If you are not sure your horse has a balanced diet or is getting proper nutrients, consider talking with a nutritionist.

3. Do Not Over Bathe

When it gets warmer it is easy to bathe horses too frequently, especially if they are grey. While it may seem like a good idea to keep them clean, it can dry out their skin and coat. Also, legs that are are not dried properly can be susceptible to scratches and other skin conditions. If your horse does get warm after exercise, try sponging and toweling off where they are sweaty or putting fans in front of them so they dry faster. For owners of grey horses, spot removers are useful for removing stained areas without doing a full bath. If you must bathe your horse during the hot months of summer, consider using conditioner instead of shampoo. This will help moisturize the coat instead of drying it out. When applying, avoid the saddle area as this will make it very slippery. Also, do not put conditioner in the mane or tail if you plan on braiding your horse for a competition in the near future.

4. Protect From the Sun

During the spring, summer, and early fall a horse’s coat can often get sun bleached from being turned out, especially if the paddock is not well-shaded. This can be solved by either doing night turnout or getting a fly sheet to protect your horse from the sun as well as flies. A fly sheet may also help keep your horse a little cleaner so you can avoid daily baths.

5. Invest in a Coat Shine Product

To add a little extra gleam to your horse’s coat, purchase a coat shine product. There are many options that can help make your horse’s coat soft, shiny, and healthy. These sprays often contain conditioner that moisturizes the coat. Make sure to check the ingredients and avoid any products containing silicone, which can actually dry out the coat. Similar to applying conditioner during a bath, be careful about avoiding the area where the saddle goes.

Whether or not you plan on showing, a beautiful, healthy, and shiny coat is something that all horse owners can achieve. Test out these tips this spring to get your horse’s coat looking its best.

Have questions about utilizing BarnManager or want to give it a try for yourself? Request a live demo here!

BarnManager is designed to be a part of your team, with the compatibility and credentials necessary to improve communication, simplify the management of horses, and get you out of the office, off the phone calls, and into the barn with the horses you care about! Click here to get a free demo and find out more!

Five Tips To Stay Organized During a Busy Horse Show Day

Horse show days can be extremely hectic and overwhelming. The key to success during those types of days is staying organized. Read some of BarnManager’s tips to tackle a busy day at any competition.

1. Make a Plan

The first step in staying organized during a busy horse show day actually happens the afternoon or night before. If you know you are going to have a day with lots of horses and clients showing, take time to make a plan the day before. Many barns write out the schedule on a whiteboard. This way all trainers, grooms, managers, and riders are aware of what the day will look like. Ideally, this schedule includes what ring each horse shows in and an approximate time the horse should be at the ring ready to go. Noting the name of the class is helpful if the horse shows in both the hunters and equitation and requires different equipment for each discipline. Deciding who will take care of each horse and bring it to the ring can also make the plan run efficiently throughout the busy show day. Including orders of go for classes, when available, is another useful piece of information that can help keep everyone on time.
(Did you know? BarnManager has a virtual whiteboard feature so everyone can see the schedule while up at the ring and make or view any adjustments!)

2. Organize Equipment

Setting out equipment needed for each horse beforehand can save a lot of time throughout the day. If each horse’s saddle, bridle, martingale, girth, saddle pad, and number are neatly piled together, you do not have to worry about a horse arriving to the ring with the wrong equipment or an employee being late because they could not find the correct boots. It takes a few extra minutes to organize the night before or in the morning, but it will save time and energy once the day has started.

3. Be Flexible

Horse shows are known for not always running on time and horses themselves can often be unpredictable. For these reasons, you have to be able to be flexible in your plan. If a ring is running late or one of the horses pulls a shoe before a class, you must be able to alter your schedule quickly in order to deal with the last-minute changes. Last-minute adjustments in a well-thought-out plan can be overcome with a little patience, flexibility, teamwork, and good problem-solving skills.

4. Communication

Effective communication is always a necessity in a barn, especially during a hectic horse show day. The only way that all employees will know and understand the plan is through communication. Also, if something changes, everyone must be told of the alterations so the day can continue to run smoothly. Constant and clear communication throughout the day is important so everyone stays up to date. Many barns use group texts or walkie-talkies so that all staff members are updated about changes at the same time.

5. Checklist

Creating a checklist to go through at the end of the day is a great way to make sure all tasks were completed. This checklist can include specific aftercare for the horses, making feed, any tack alterations for the next day, and making sure all equipment was clean and properly put away. Make a specific checklist for each show day and add items to it as you go. Take time at the end of the day to review and fine-tune your plan for the next day.
(Did you know? BarnManager has a list feature so you can make a daily checklist. You can also share this checklist with your team at a show!)

While horse showing can be stressful and exhausting, especially on busy days, the most important tip is to remember to have fun and enjoy the successful moments both in and out of the ring.

Have questions about utilizing BarnManager or want to give it a try for yourself? Request a live demo here!

BarnManager is designed to be a part of your team, with the compatibility and credentials necessary to improve communication, simplify the management of horses, and get you out of the office, off the phone calls, and into the barn with the horses you care about! Click here to get a free demo and find out more!

Five Tips To Organize Your Tack Room

A tack room can be a busy area where people are constantly in and out, looking for items, or socializing. For these reasons, keeping a tack room clean and organized is no easy task. Read about a few of BarnManager’s favorite tips on how to keep this area neat throughout the day.

1. Sort Your Tack

The first step in organizing your tack room is to sort all of your equipment. Extra pieces of tack can pile up over time, so it is helpful to go through and decide what you actually need every once in a while. Make several piles for tack that you currently use, extra items you may need, leather that needs to get fixed, equipment that can be donated, and tack that has to be thrown away. During this cleanout, look for items that do not actually need to be there and are taking up useful space. This is the perfect time to take those things out and put them in their correct spot somewhere else.

While you are organizing your tack, you should take inventory of what you have. It is always nice to know how many extra sets of reins, stirrup leathers, or nosebands you have, especially if something breaks. Make a note of where you store the equipment, so it is easy to find when you need it. You can use BarnManager’s list function to write down where the extra tack is kept and share it with all employees.

2. Create Sections

Depending on the size of your tack room and how many horses and clients you have, it is helpful to create different sections within the tack room. To do this, make sure you have a lot of extra hooks and bridle racks. If you attend a lot of horse shows, think about designating one wall for horse show bridles and a separate wall for schooling tack. This will make packing for a horse show very simple and help keep everything organized. Another option is to separate tack by client or horse. This gives each client their own spot, so it is easier to keep things neat and reduce confusion. Separating tack by client will also make it easier for all employees to easily understand which equipment goes with each horse and rider.

Create a separate spot for extra equipment so it does not accidentally get mixed in with the everyday tack. If your tack room does not have cabinets or storage spots, you may want to invest in a couple of drawers or bins where these items can go. Putting your extra tack away in storage containers will help keep the room looking less cluttered and make things easy to find. If possible, try to stay away from open shelving that can get disorganized and messy looking throughout the day.

3. Organize Bits

Similar to leather tack, bit collections can also grow over the years. If you have extra bridle racks or hooks, consider keeping a few useful bits out so that you can quickly switch to them if needed. Organize the rest of your bits by type and then store them away in a tack trunk or cabinet. Large metal binder rings can be used to keep bits of the same style all together so when you are looking for a certain type it is easy to find. If you are keeping your bits in a cabinet, it may be helpful to create hooks or sections to separate the bits.

4. Give Everything a Home

One of the most important steps to ensure that everything is returned properly and stays organized is to give all items a home. While it may be easy to keep the tack organized, make sure smaller items like saddle pads, bandages, veterinary creams, and any other supplies have a specific spot where they are stored as well. Creating a system like this will help keep things from getting left in random places or piling up in a certain spot throughout the day, especially if there are multiple people using the same supplies.

5. Label All Items

Once your equipment is in place, the final step is to label everything. This will give people a clear idea about where items are stored and help make sure that everything is returned properly. You can label bridles, saddles, bits, cabinets, and bins. Having all equipment labeled will also be beneficial when you have a new employee or client because they will immediately understand where all the supplies belong.

Organizing your tack room may seem like a daunting job, but it is worth it in the long run. A neat tack room can help make equipment easier to find while also keeping your barn looking orderly and tidy.

Have questions about utilizing BarnManager or want to give it a try for yourself? Request a live demo here!

BarnManager is designed to be a part of your team, with the compatibility and credentials necessary to improve communication, simplify the management of horses, and get you out of the office, off the phone calls, and into the barn with the horses you care about! Click here to get a free demo and find out more!

Five Alternative Fitness Ideas for Riders

5 Alternative Fitness Routines for Riders

Five Alternative Fitness Ideas for Riders

Anyone who has ridden a sport horse can make the powerful argument that what we do is, in fact, a sport. We laugh off those who say the horse does all the work because we truly know what a full-body workout it can be and the strength and conditioning required to execute the sport successfully.

But even the fittest of riders need to complement their riding with other forms of exercise. Football players do yoga to keep them balanced and focused. Why shouldn’t riders work on outside exercises that aid them in their riding? Many riders already know their preferred workout method, but if you’re not sure where to start, here are some ideas to expand your fitness routine outside of the saddle.

1. Pilates

Known for targeting specific muscles and utilizing smaller movements in order to strengthen the whole body, Pilates can be a great workout option for riders looking to gain strength all over. Small, repetitive movements can help solidify muscle memory and help stabilize your muscles to be a stronger and steadier rider. Many Pilates studios are offering online classes. You can also find outdoor pop-up classes near you that foster social distancing and follow COVID-19 safety protocols.

2. HIIT

Any hunter/jumper rider knows the feeling of exiting the show ring completely winded, after a very intense, but short, two-minute workout. It’s hard to build endurance for those high-intensity moments since we can’t really replicate them outside of a show environment. That’s where High Intensity Interval Training can be your best friend (or worst enemy, depending on your workout style). Many gyms and trainers are offering virtual HIIT classes that help athletes get their heart rate up, recover, and repeat. These exercises feel like a ton of work. But they will increase your fitness level to a point where those jumping rounds will feel like light work.

3. Yoga

Though the exercises in yoga don’t translate directly to what you do when riding, the benefits of yoga are evident in many aspects of the sport. Riding is a mental sport, and being strong mentally is often equally as important as being strong physically. Yoga helps to center your focus, relax your body, and prepare you to take on challenges that lie ahead. It also focuses on strength and stretching, leaving you more nimble and easing any pain or tension that may keep you from performing your best. Yoga can improve your balance as a rider, as well, keeping you centered during tough situations. Horses also benefit from balanced riders, helping to resolve any imbalances the horses may have themselves.

4. Cycling

We all know the value of a strong leg and solid core for helping your horse effectively use its hind end and jump clear rounds. Cycling is an excellent exercise to help strengthen your leg muscles and engage your core at the same time. Because it’s such a high-intensity workout, cycling is a great way to get your cardio in. This will also help to increase your endurance in the saddle. Though cycling studios are mostly closed due to COVID-19, there are many ways to get stationary bikes set up in your own home, or you can buy a street bike that you can ride (safely, of course) through the hills of your city or town. Pro tip: after an intense cycling session, practice stretching deeply down through your heels with your feet in the “stirrups.” This will loosen your calf muscles and help you keep your heels stretched down next time you sit in the (real) saddle.

5. A personal fitness trainer

Doing the same workout every day or not knowing what workouts are best for your goals are common issues for athletes working without supervision. Personal fitness trainers are now more accessible than ever, so if you have specific goals that you’re not sure how to achieve, look into working with an expert. It doesn’t have to be a long-term commitment; many trainers will teach you work-out circuits to implement on your own, after learning how to do them properly and safely. Though personal trainers are on the more expensive end of workout options, their expertise can be priceless. So if overall fitness is an ultimate goal of yours, do some research about personal fitness trainers that have experience in training equestrian athletes.

 

Have questions about utilizing BarnManager or want to give it a try for yourself? Request a live demo here!

BarnManager is designed to be a part of your team, with the compatibility and credentials necessary to improve communication, simplify the management of horses, and get you out of the office, off the phone calls, and into the barn with the horses you care about! Click here to get a free demo and find out more!

Emma Ford’s Cold Weather Grooming Tips

Winter weather can prove difficult for horse’s skin. Decreased daylight, mud, sweat, and blankets create various challenges for horses and riders during the colder months.

Event Clinics caught up with Emma Ford, head groom for Phillip Dutton Eventing and co-author of World Class Grooming for Horses for some ways to keep your equine partner’s skin happy & healthy this season, and now Event Clinics and Emma are sharing their tips with us!

1.  Use witch hazel or rubbing alcohol to wipe down a damp horse after exercise. 

“These products are help to dry the area quicker but also clean off sweat and dirt. I use Witch Hazel, especially when I know the horse has dry, sensitive skin,” says Emma.

#HelpfulHint: Use a spray bottle to apply to any sweaty areas after your horse is untacked, then rub down with a towel

2. Re-hydrate your horse’s skin. 

If your horse gets extra sweaty after a challenging winter workout, sponge off any affected areas with a bucket of warm water mixed with one cup of Witch Hazel and a tablespoon of Shapley’s #1 Light Oil.

#HelpfulHint: Emma tells EC, “This combination to help lift off dirt whilst adding a bit of oil back to the skin.”

3.  Swap and layer coolers for a quick-dry effect. 

If possible have on hand an Irish Knit or Waffle Cooler as well as a Wool or Fleece Cooler.

After wiping/sponging your horse off; layer the coolers, using the Irish Knit as the bottom layer. This will create the wicking effect to help dry your horse quicker.

#HelpfulHint: Keep extra layers handy if at all possible. That way, if you see condensation on the top layer, you can swap that layer out to help your horse dry.

4. Only re-apply blankets to a properly cooled-out horse, 

Before you put on your regular blankets, whether stable or turn outs, make sure your horse is thoroughly cooled out.

Sweating under non-breathable blankets can result in a chill, and lead to sore, stiff muscles. Or, for those more susceptible horses, even illness. This can all be easily avoided by ensuring that your horse is sufficiently cool prior to blanketing.

#HelpfulHint: If he is dry but still warm, he could continue to heat up under less breathable layers resulting in sweating.

ABOUT EMMA FORD: Emma Ford has been Head Groom for Phillip Dutton Eventing for 15 years, ensuring top quality care for equine athletes both at home and at the world’s most prestigious international competitions. In 2015, Ford published World Class Grooming for Horses alongside Professional Groom Cat Hill, who formerly managed Olympian and Five-Star Eventer Mara DePuy’s program.

BarnManager is designed to be a part of your team, with the compatibility and credentials necessary to improve communication, simplify the management of horses, and get you out of the office, off the phone calls, and into the barn with the horses you care about! Click here to get a free demo and find out more!

Playing it Safe: 10 Barn Safety Tips

When it comes to riding and keeping horses, accidents and injuries are not uncommon, and tragedy can sometimes strike. With a little bit of preparation andattention to safety however, you can make your barn a safer place to be for both horses and humans.

1.) Use breakaway crossties. 

Crossties can be dangerous if a horse panics and isn’t able to break the ties. Make sure that your crossties have safety snaps or easy-break ties. To create these easy break ties, run a loop of baling twine through a screw eye in the wall and attach the crossties to the baling twine rather than directly to the wall. This will allow the twine to snap, freeing the horse in the case of an emergency.

2.) Keep hay and shavings away from the main barn whenever possible.

While it may not be realistic for all barn setups, keeping hay and shavings in a separate, dry location away from the main barn area is a great way to reduce fire risks. ProEquineGrooms gives great advice on hay storage here, explaining that “Combustion can occur if the hay just right – sometimes too hot and too dry, or even or too hot and still moist inside!”

3.) Dust and remove cobwebs on a regular basis.

Much like hay and shavings, dust and cobwebs can act like kindling in the case of a barn fire. Routine dusting can prevent fire from spreading quickly should tragedy ever strike.

4.) Keep first aid kits on hand for both horses and humans.

Accidents inevitably happen, but having first aid kits on hand can help you reduce risks and address issues quickly. Not sure what to include in your equine first aid kit? Check out this thorough list from TheHorse.com!

5.) Have a landline phone at your barn.

Landline phones are becoming harder to come by, but for safety reasons, it’s a good idea to maintain one at your barn. Cell service can often be disrupted, and in many barn locations it’s spotty at best. In case of an emergency and in any weather, you want to be sure to have a reliable phone on hand.

6.) Check your electric.

Electricity is not something we often pay much attention to in the barn – until it isn’t working or something goes wrong. To prevent electrical risks, make sure that all outlets and switches are recessed with protective covers to keep dust out. If you have conventional light bulbs or light strips, have cages over them for protection. If there are certain things that are always on or plugged in, like a refrigerator, be sure that they are plugged into a surge protector. Make sure that all wiring is covered by metal and not by PVC tubing, as small animals and birds can destroy the tubing and begin to chew on wires.

7.) Keep barn aisles clean and clear.

Rakes, pitchforks, tack, grooming boxes, or halters left out in the barn aisle way can easily be tripped over by humans or cause incident for horses. Be sure to clean up after yourself and keep your aisle way tidy to prevent injury or accident.

8.) Lock up any potentially hazardous materials including medications, fly sprays, and cleaning supplies.

Any such materials should be kept locked and out of access by children or pets who could wrongly use or swallow them.

9.) Make needed repairs as soon as you notice something amiss.

If you notice a loose fence board, a faulty latch, a protruding nail, or any other potential hazard, act on it quickly, rather than waiting for it to become a larger issue – even if the repair seems like something that could be overlooked for a time.

10.) Post barn rules, emergency contacts, and emergency instructions in a prominent location.

It can also be beneficial to go over emergency instructions and action plans with everyone in your barn.

BarnManager is designed to be a part of your team, with the compatibility and credentials necessary to improve communication, simplify the management of horses, and get you out of the office, off the phone calls, and into the barn with the horses you care about! Click here to get a free demo and find out more!

Eating Healthy at Horse Shows: Five Ways to Stay (or Get) on Track

We carefully plan our horses’ meals, weigh their feed, and provide them supplements and the proper nutrition that they need as equine athletes.

But what about our own nutrition and needs as an athlete? That often looks more like a skipped breakfast as we’re rushing out the door, whatever burger or fries we’re able to scarf down at the horse show food stand, or that delicious Nutella-filled crepe calling our name from the crepe stand.

The fact is though, as riders, we’re athletes too! If we expect our horses to perform their best, it’s important for us to fuel our bodies in a way that allows us to ride our best.

We know it’s not always easy with busy show days and tempting, convenient food vendors, but here are five tips to help you stay (or get) on track.

1.) Don’t Skip Breakfast! 

It’s been said that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, but for horseman and women, it’s often the most skipped meal of the day! Our days start early, and we’re often in a hurry to get to the barn or the show ring. However, by skipping breakfast, we’re only setting ourselves up for failure.

To get the most of your breakfast, try to include a combination of protein, carbs, and fats to give you energy and to keep you satisfied until lunch time.

“If you start with a good breakfast, you’re geared up for the day,” said amateur equestrian Michelle Durpetti, who trains with True North Stables. “I’m not as hungry; I’m not as inclined to go get fries or something like that. It’s so easy to forget at horse shows that you are also an athlete.”

Durpetti recently began placing more of an emphasis on her own nutrition while at horse shows, and she and trainer Caitlyn Shiels start most days with their own smoothie blend.

“I heat up almond milk every morning, and I use a superfood greens powder,” said Durpetti. “I add in probiotics and prebiotics, and it has an apple and cinnamon taste. It kind of tastes like old-school oatmeal.”

Show jumper Hannah Selleck of Descanso Farm is another rider who has made her own health and fitness a priority, alongside that of her horses, and even on her busiest mornings, she ensures that she doesn’t skip a protein-filled morning meal.

“Sometimes I’ll have a coffee, ride a few, but then make sure that I get protein and eat breakfast,” said Selleck. “I never want to skip a meal or feel like I don’t have energy, so I make sure that I’m eating throughout the day when I’m showing.”

2.) Plan Ahead 

It’s no secret that you’re more likely to grab a sugary snack or order that convenient burger and fries when you let yourself get to the point that you’re starving or don’t have other alternatives readily available, so it’s important to plan ahead.

By the end of a long show day, it’s normal to be exhausted and to want to reach for whatever is available or to grab a quick (likely, unhealthy) dinner on your way home. Instead, try to meal plan or prep your meals in advance if you know you’re not going to feel up to cooking after you’ve finished riding and showing. Pre-made meal services are also a great option if they’re within your meal budget, and Pinterest is a great resource if you’re looking for meal prep recipes like these or these.

3.) Keep Snacks on Hand

Planning ahead and packing snacks go hand-in-hand! As a professional hunter/jumper rider and trainer riding a number of a horses a day and going from ring-to-ring, Shiels relies on pre-packed snacks, so she always tries to keep a banana, dried fruit, and almonds in her ring backpack for a quick pick me up when needed. For Selleck, turkey jerky sticks and RX Bars are her go-tos.

Apples and carrots also make great snack options (for you and your horse!), as does trail mix or a pre-prepared protein shake. Other protein sources like hard-boiled eggs, tuna packets, or no-bake protein bites also travel well and can make for a great pick-me-up. (Google “no-bake protein bites” or “no-bake protein energy bites” for a number of quick, easy recipes!)

4.) Stay Hydrated 

Keeping your body hydrated while showing is just as important for your health as proper nutrition.

Try keeping a cooler packed with ice, small water bottles, and sports drinks at your stalls, on your golf cart, or near your horse trailer so that you never have to worry about finding something to drink at the show. (As an added bonus, packing your own drinks will save you money at the horse show, where drinks are often more expensive!) Thirst is also often mistaken as hunger, so by quenching your thirst, you may be less likely to go looking for something unhealthy to eat! Try to steer clear of sugary, caffeinated sodas during the day, as they won’t do the job to keep you hydrated and will only give you a temporary boost before your blood sugar drops.

5.) Make It a Group Effort

Keep yourself on a healthy track by encouraging your barn mates to do the same. Hold each other accountable to healthy eating and offer to take turns providing healthy snacks or filling up the barn cooler with waters and sports drinks for the team. Consider swapping recipe ideas, packing group lunches, or even creating fun challenges like all trying to drink a certain amount of water each day of the show. Have fun with it, and enjoy feeling better as the group of athletes that you are!

BarnManager is designed to be a part of your team, with the compatibility and credentials necessary to improve communication, simplify the management of horses, and get you out of the office, off the phone calls, and into the barn with the horses you care about! Click here to get a free demo and find out more!

How to Clean Your Grooming Brushes

When was the last time you really cleaned your horses’ brushes? If you’re like many of us, we venture to guess it’s been longer than the recommended every week to two weeks!

The good news is, washing your brushes is quick and easy to do, and it goes a long way in helping your horse be as clean and healthy as possible. (It’s tough to have a clean horse if you’re using dirty tools!) Consider setting aside 10 to 15 minutes every other week for washing your brushes, and then follow these simple steps!:

– Fill a bucket with warm water and a drop or two of shampoo. It’s best to stick to the shampoo that you would usually use on your horse, and it’s important to avoid using any rough household cleaners that could cause irritation to your horse or that could potentially contain harmful ingredients.

– After any loose hair has been removed from the brushes, add them to the bucket, and swish them around, allowing the loosest dirt and debris to come off. Then, work the shampoo into the bristles thoroughly.

– Once you’ve shampooed the brushes, allow them to sit and “marinate” in the bucket for five to 10 minutes to really get clean.

– After the brushes have had time to soak, rinse them out with clean water from a house. Then rinse again. And possibly again. It’s important to make sure that any and all shampoo is rinsed out of the brushes so that it doesn’t dry within the brushes later.

– When you’re sure the brushes have been well rinsed, shake them out, and lay them out to dry on clean ground or grass or on a shelf or similar. Be sure to leave the brushes laying on their sides so the water doesn’t consolidate at the bottom of the bristles and end up damaging the brush handle. And viola! Clean brushes!

BarnManager is designed to be a part of your team, with the compatibility and credentials necessary to improve communication, simplify the management of horses, and get you out of the office, off the phone calls, and into the barn with the horses you care about! Click here to get a free demo and find out more!