Must-Watch Live Streams in April

The spring horse show season promises an exciting lineup of events to enjoy starting in April. Continue reading to find out where you can watch some of the biggest jumping, eventing, and dressage competitions for the month.

$500,000 Rolex Grand Prix CSI5* at the Winter Equestrian Festival (WEF): April 2, 2022 – The highlight show jumping event of WEF is the $500,000 Rolex Grand Prix CSI5*. This will take place on the derby field at Equestrian Village in Wellington, FL.

Where to watch: Wellington International

FEI World Cup™ Finals: April 6-10, 2022 – The 2022 FEI World Cup™ Finals for dressage and show jumping will take in Leipzig, Germany. The dressage team will include Anna Buffini and Ashley Holzer. Misti Cassar, Katie Dinan, Margie Engle, Hunter Holloway, Schuyler Riley, Aaron Vale, Kristen Vanderveen, Alessandra Volpi, and McLain Ward will represent the U.S. Jumping team.

Where to watch: ClipMyHorse.TV

Pin Oak Charity Horse Show Week III: April 6-10, 2022 – The final week of the Pin Oak Charity Horse Show, located in Katy, TX, features hunter, jumper, and equitation classes. There will be two grand prix classes taking place Thursday, April 7, and Saturday, April 9. Additionally, there will be a National and an International Hunter Derby held on Friday, April 8.

Where to watch: Horse & Country

National Collegiate Equestrian Association (NCEA) National Championship: April 14-16, 2022 – The NCEA National Championship is a competition for collegiate riders. It will be held at World Equestrian Center – Ocala. Riders competing in the jumping seat discipline are judged over fences and on the flat. Western riders compete in reining and horsemanship events.

Where to watch: Horse & Country

World Equestrian Center – Ocala Dressage III: April 14-16, 2022 – Dressage riders will take the spotlight at World Equestrian – Center Ocala during the Dressage III CDI3* show in Ocala, FL. It is also a USEF/USDF-sanctioned Level 5 competition. The CDI classes will be held in the Grand Arena, with the Grand Prix Freestyle CDI3* under the lights on Friday, April 15.

Where to watch: ClipMyHorse.TV

Longines Global Champions Tour (LGCT) Miami Beach: April 14-16, 2022 – This beautiful show features five-star, two-star, and Global Champions League show jumping competition right on the beach in Miami, FL. The Longines Global Champions Tour Grand Prix of Miami Beach will be the highlight event, taking place Saturday, April 16.

Where to watch: GCTV

Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event: April 28-May 1, 2022 – During the last week of April, five-star eventing competition will take place at the Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event. It is held at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington, KY. The dressage phase will begin on Thursday, April 28, and continue to Friday, April 29. Riders will test out the cross-country course on Saturday, April 30, and show jumping takes place on Sunday, May 1.

Where to watch: USEF Network

 

Have questions about utilizing BarnManager or want to give it a try for yourself? Request a live demo here!

BarnManager is designed to be a part of your team, with the compatibility and credentials necessary to improve communication, simplify the management of horses, and get you out of the office, off the phone calls, and into the barn with the horses you care about! Click here to get a free demo and find out more!

BarnManager’s Favorite Equestrian Podcasts

Equestrian podcasts are more popular than ever these days. They are perfect to listen to on the go and can be educational, entertaining, and inspiring. Since there are so many to choose from, we have compiled a list of some of our current favorites.

 

Horses in the Morning

Hosted by Glenn Hebert of Horse Radio Network and equestrian Jamie Jennings, Horses in the Morning is a long-standing podcast that is all about equestrians. Listeners will get their daily dose of the horse world through entertaining conversations with guests. The show includes several regular horse-related segments in addition to listener call-ins and contests.

Click here to listen: https://www.horseradionetwork.com/category/9am-live-horses-in-the-morning/

 

Sport Horse Podcast

Sport Horse Podcast is the newest show in this lineup and is hosted by BarnManager’s founder Nicole Lakin and Dr. Tim Worden, a sport scientist and member of the Equine High Performance Sports Group as well as the Sport Horse Research Foundation. During this new podcast, Lakin and Dr. Worden talk to leading equestrians and researchers about the science behind training and management techniques for equine athletes. Listeners will learn how science and horsemanship can work together to improve equine performance results.

Click here to listen: https://www.sporthorseseries.com/podcast

Equestrian B2B Podcast

The Equestrian B2B Podcast features conversations with business leaders and entrepreneurs in the equestrian industry. Hosted by Jennifer Wood and Jennifer Connor of Equestrian Businesswomen, this educational podcast gives listeners important tips on starting, maintaining, and enjoying a successful business.

Click here to listen: https://www.eqbusinesswomen.com/equestrian-b2b-podcast-show-notes

The Plaidcast

On The Plaidcast, Piper Klemm of The Plaid Horse speaks with top hunter, jumper, and equitation riders, trainers, horse show managers, and industry experts. Klemm is joined by several co-hosts, including Traci Brooks of Balmoral Farm, mental skills coach Tonya Johnston, Michael Tokaruk of Tokaruk Show Stables, and several others. Guests discuss topics such as how they became successful in the industry, horsemanship, and tips for riders.

Click here to listen: https://www.theplaidhorse.com/the-plaidcast/

Young Black Equestrians

The Young Black Equestrians podcast is hosted by Abriana Johnson, an equestrian, author, and entrepreneur. This podcast shines a spotlight on significant Black people who are part of the equestrian world. Johnson aims to educate, promote diversity, and increase access to the horse community through her podcast.

Click here to listen: https://youngblackequestrians.com/podcast/

Equestrian Voices

Noelle Floyd’s Equestrian Voices is hosted by Caroline Culbertson and brings up some of the deeper topics of life as an equestrian. Guests talk about issues such as over-competing horses, mental health, and the realities of becoming a professional in the industry.

Click here to listen: https://www.noellefloyd.com/blogs/equestrian-voices-podcast

USHJA On Course

USHJA On Course is the official podcast of the United States Hunter Jumper Association. The podcast welcomes top junior, amateur, and professional riders to discuss the sport as well as matters beyond the show ring.

Click here to listen: https://www.ushja.org/news/on-course-podcast

Heels Down Happy Hour

Sit back, relax, and catch up on all the horse show news with the Heels Down Happy Hour podcast. Journalist Justine Griffin, international event rider Jessica Payne, and book designer Ellie Woznica talk about all the recent events in the equestrian industry and what listeners should know to stay informed.

Click here to listen: https://heelsdownmag.com/category/listen/

The Equestrian Podcast

On The Equestrian Podcast, host Bethany Lee of My Equestrian Style talks to some of the top riders, professionals, and business owners in the equestrian world. While on this podcast, guests discuss their work with horses as well as some less conventional topics of working with horses.

Click here to listen: https://equestrianpodcast.podbean.com

Next time you are driving to the barn, getting your horse ready, or cleaning tack, test out one of these podcasts to stay up to date with the equine industry.

Have questions about utilizing BarnManager or want to give it a try for yourself? Request a live demo here!

BarnManager is designed to be a part of your team, with the compatibility and credentials necessary to improve communication, simplify the management of horses, and get you out of the office, off the phone calls, and into the barn with the horses you care about! Click here to get a free demo and find out more!

 

Horse Show Highlights From 2021

After a year of limited horse showing in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, equestrians were excited to get back in the show ring in 2021. Learn about some favorite 2021 horse show memories from grooms, trainers, and managers.

Linda Birk

Groom for Margie Goldstein-Engle, based in Wellington, FL

Linda Birk and Cesna. Photo by Alden Corrigan Media

What was your favorite memory of 2021?

It’s so difficult for me to pick one favorite horse show memory because there are so many to choose from! If I had to highlight one, it would probably be the last show of the year for us, the Fort Worth International CSI4*-W at Split Rock Jumping Tour in Fort Worth, Texas. We brought Royce and Dicas, Margie’s two main horses. Both boys jumped incredibly throughout the week. Margie got sick before the show, so I rode them up to and during the show. It was a huge relief when they jumped well after I’d kept them going. Royce placed second in the 1.50m qualifier with only three competing in the jump-off. He had the fastest time but an unlucky rail on the second-to-last fence. Dicas jumped in the World Cup Grand Prix, and as usual he gave it all he has and was double clear to end fourth. I always expect the horses to jump well, but that week was extra special due to the circumstances with Margie. They really jumped their hearts out.

What are you most looking forward to in 2022?

I am looking forward to making lots more memories in 2022. WEF 2022 will be here before we know it. I hope we will qualify for the World Cup Final in Leipzig, Germany. We have one more qualifier in Ocala coming up in March, so fingers crossed!

Krista Goosens

Assistant Trainer and Manager for Brianne Goutal LLC and The Propp Family, based in Wellington, FL, and Long Island, NY

Krista Goosens talking with Stella Propp at the in-gate. Photo by Kind Media

What was your favorite memory of 2021?

My favorite horse show memory from 2021 was definitely Stella Propp and Heaven’s Dream earning Grand Junior Hunter Champion at the National Horse Show. We leased this horse in January 2021 for Stella to show during her last junior year. It took us a little while to get the hang of things with him, but over the year he just kept getting better and better. We hit our stride with him during the summer, but when indoors started we struggled a bit to pull it all together. The National was Stella’s last show with “Dreamy” and her last show as a junior rider. I think our entire team (Dreamy included) really dug deep and pulled out all the stops for our final show, and it really paid off. The most rewarding part of this job is seeing my kids and horses succeed, so winning such a major title at such a prestigious show meant the world to me.

 

What are you most looking forward to in 2022?

I am looking forward to a great 2022 with the Brianne Goutal LLC team, and I am excited to see how our clients and horses progress this year.

Payton Wendler

Groom and Manager, most recently for Millar Brooke Farm based in Wellington, FL, and Lexington, KY

Payton Wendler preparing for the show ring. Photo courtesy of Payton Wendler

What was your favorite memory of 2021?

I have a lot of great memories from the 2021 show season! One of my favorite horse show memories was during the time I worked for Jonathon Millar and Kelly Soleau-Millar at Millar Brooke Farm. I had the opportunity to show a young horse that I was lucky enough to help develop. I had been out of the show ring for a couple of years, so it was great to be back in the ring on a horse I really enjoyed working with.

What are you most looking forward to in 2022?

I am looking forward to getting back in the show ring again! I am also excited to continue to help keep my horses happy, healthy, and performing at their best.

BarnManager would like to wish everyone a happy and healthy 2022. Make sure to look out for the new BarnManager Pro coming out in January!

Have questions about utilizing BarnManager or want to give it a try for yourself? Request a live demo here!

BarnManager is designed to be a part of your team, with the compatibility and credentials necessary to improve communication, simplify the management of horses, and get you out of the office, off the phone calls, and into the barn with the horses you care about! Click here to get a free demo and find out more!

The BarnManager Q&A With: Kiira M. Lizza, Manager at Grafton Ridge

The BarnManager Q&A With:

Kiira M. Lizza, Manager at Grafton Ridge, located in South Salem, NY, and Wellington, FL

What are three things that are always in your ring bag?

Kiira: A towel, hoof oil, and extra earplugs.

What is the most helpful habit that you practice at the barn?

Kiira: At Grafton Ridge, we practice a gold standard of horse care habits. I like to say we practice FEI-level care at a national level. Coming from an FEI background having worked for both Anne Kursinski and Leslie Howard, I love different therapies and am always looking for extra things we can do for the horses to help them feel their best. I am also big on proper turnout time and rest for the horses. They work very hard for us, and we like to make sure they have some downtime in the paddock after showing. All of our horses, no matter if they do the leadline or the upper-level jumpers, get some type of therapy on a daily basis. This could be the laser, the UltrOZ™, magnetic blanket, TheraPlate, etc. We’re very passionate about horse care and making sure the horses are healthy, fit, and most importantly, happy!

How do you foster a great team environment in your business?

Kiira: A great team environment is something we pride ourselves on at Grafton Ridge. Michael Delfiandra and Vanessa Roman have built an incredibly organized, systemized, and positive work environment that is truly the best show barn I have ever worked in. We hold weekly team meetings, encourage open communication, and celebrate the small wins. These practices have fostered a trusting team that allows us to depend on one another and find joy in the day-to-day hustle and bustle of a busy show barn. A large part of the curriculum in my MBA studies at Warwick Business School in England was focused on self-introspection and how to develop high-performing teams. I like to bring what I learned during my MBA and put it into practice in the barn.

Kiira Lizza competing in the hunters.

What’s your best tip or hack for grooming and horse care? Where did you learn it?

Kiira: I am a big fan of currying! Currying is a great way to not only loosen dirt and hair off your horse, but also gives the muscles a nice massage and gives the groom an opportunity to look over every inch of the horse. I am also big on baby powder on the legs. I am crazy about the legs being dry after baths, clipping, etc., to prevent scratches. For horse care in general, you have to let them be horses. Proper turnout time, good nutrition, and an excellent vet and farrier are the foundation of great horse care.

What is your favorite equestrian competition and why?

Kiira: This is tough! I love Lake Placid in New York but am also a big fan of the Middleburg Classic in Virginia. Both these shows have great hospitality, beautiful facilities and jumps, and are in a great location for non-horse show activities.

If you were a horse, what would you be and why?

Kiira: I’d like to think I’d be an amateur’s upper-level jumper. This way I could be someone’s forever horse and receive all the pampering I need to do my job well.

 

Have questions about utilizing BarnManager or want to give it a try for yourself? Request a live demo here!

BarnManager is designed to be a part of your team, with the compatibility and credentials necessary to improve communication, simplify the management of horses, and get you out of the office, off the phone calls, and into the barn with the horses you care about! Click here to get a free demo and find out more!

The BarnManager Q&A With: Stephanie Nell, groom for Olympic gold medalist Rodrigo Pessoa

The BarnManager Q&A With:

Stephanie Nell, groom for Olympic gold medalist Rodrigo Pessoa


What are three things that are always in your ring bag?
Stephanie: I always have the safety vest, sugar cubes, and a towel!

What is the most helpful habit that you practice at the barn?
Stephanie: Routine – things don’t always go according to plan with this job, but it’s good to have some sort of consistency for the horses to keep them level headed (and for the people).

How do you foster a great team environment in your business?
Stephanie: Communication, all the way. Unfortunately, we aren’t all mind readers, so if we need something or have any concerns, we need to speak up. If we need to know something, ask!

What’s your best tip or hack for grooming and horse care? Where did you learn it?
Stephanie: A mixture spray of witch hazel and vinegar for irritated skin. At my first job, I took care of a chestnut mare with highly sensitive skin, so every now and then we would have a rash breakout. To suppress the rash, I would spray that mixture once or twice a day. I swear it’s magic in a bottle!

What is your favorite equestrian sport and why?
Stephanie: Show jumping through and through. I’m always in awe when I watch horses, especially the ones I care for, compete at the highest level of the sport. It makes me feel luckier to do what I do every time I’m on the side watching them go.

If you were a horse, what would you be and why?
Stephanie: I think I’d like to be a wild Icelandic pony. They live in a beautiful part of the world and are known to be tough and sturdy, yet kind and curious.

 

Have questions about utilizing BarnManager or want to give it a try for yourself? Request a live demo here!

BarnManager is designed to be a part of your team, with the compatibility and credentials necessary to improve communication, simplify the management of horses, and get you out of the office, off the phone calls, and into the barn with the horses you care about! Click here to get a free demo and find out more!

Female Force: Women in the 2020 Olympic Games

When you’re flipping through channels of Olympic coverage this year, you may notice all sports have one thing in common: they are split into men’s and women’s competition. There is one exception, however, and that is equestrian sports. The only Olympic sport in which men and women compete against one another on a level playing field. Men and women, as well as geldings, stallions, and mares, all compete head-to-head for medals.

Women have been representing the equestrian community extremely well in the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. While equestrian is usually an underrepresented sport throughout the programming of Olympic sports, women have been making their mark—and the news!

According to calculations by dressage-news.com, as of September 1, 2020, of the 29,731 athletes in the International Equestrian Federation (FEI) database of competitors in the Olympic disciplines, the percentages of female riders were 83.10% for dressage, 73.175% for eventing, and 61.311% for show jumping. The ladies are well represented in our sport!

Sabine Schut-Kery and Sanceo helped the United States dressage team secure the silver medal in Tokyo. Photo by Jump Media

Ladies’ Night in Dressage

The equestrian events at the Tokyo 2020 Olympics kicked off with dressage in late July, and all the athletes performed incredibly. The United States’ own Sabine Schut-Kery put her nation on the map after scoring consistently in the team and individual competitions. There was no shortage of girl power as she achieved her personal best of 78.416% in the grand prix and 81.596% in the grand prix special to contribute to the U.S. team’s silver medal. Sabine finished fifth individually in the freestyle on a score of 84.300% with her mount, Sanceo. The United States leadership also had female representation, led by Chef d’Equipe Debbie McDonald.

Women in dressage rounded out the individual dressage competition by securing all three podium spots. Germany’s Jessica von Bredow-Werndl and TSF Dalera secured gold on a score of 91.732%. Silver was awarded to the world-ranked number one, Isabell Werth (GER) and Bella Rose 2. Lastly, Charlotte Dujardin (GBR) returned to the podium to take bronze on her new mount, Gio.

Olympic dressage has been dominated by women for the past six years, by having all podium titles awarded to female athletes. 2020 marks the seventh consecutive year that women have taken gold, silver, and bronze in the individual competition of dressage.

Krajewski Makes History in Eventing

Women first competed in eventing at the Olympics in Tokyo in 1964. And the 2020 Tokyo Olympics was finally the year for them to take top individual honors. Germany’s Julia Krajewski made Olympic history by being the first female Olympic champion in eventing. The 32-year-old was rewarded individual gold for Germany on a score of 26 with her mount, Amande De B’Neville, an 11-year-old Selle Français mare. The female pair were one of the few combinations to jump clear in the show jumping round, only adding 0.4 time faults to her total score.

Krajewski was the only female on the individual podium for eventing, marking a huge milestone with her achievement. As for the team competition, Laura Collett and London 52 dominated the cross-country course, showing off their undeniable partnership. She was able to represent women on the podium in team gold position with Great Britain.

Jessica Springsteen, with mount Don Juan Van De Donkhoeve, is one of two ladies on the United States show jumping team in Tokyo. Photo by Jump Media

The Future Is Female

Show jumping wrapped up equestrian competition in Tokyo at Baji Koen Equestrian Park. The highest placing individual woman was Malin Baryard-Johnsson (SWE) with Indiana. The pair finished fifth overall on a double-clear effort in the Individual Final. Baryard-Johnsson was also the only female competitor among the five pairs to jump clear in the Team Qualifier. In the team final, Baryard-Johnsson helped the Swedish team take home a gold medal. Meanwhile, the ladies of the United States, Laura Kraut and Jessica Springsteen, took home silver, putting three women on the team podium. Kraut, 55, has become the oldest woman to secure a medal at the Olympics since 1904.

In a world of sports where men can be stronger, faster, and more athletic, equestrian sports turn that idea upside down, allowing equality across all its disciplines and letting the women prove themselves as equal, and frequently better, competitors. As the Olympics in Tokyo draws to a close, we are in awe of the equestrian women who have shown some of their best performances. And we wish the best of luck to all of them as they continue their equestrian careers.

BarnManager is designed to be a part of your team, with the compatibility and credentials necessary to improve communication, simplify the management of horses, and get you out of the office, off the phone calls, and into the barn with the horses you care about! Click here to get a free demo and find out more!

Root for the Home Team: How to Watch U.S. Riders This Independence Day Weekend

It’s officially July, which means the Olympics are less than a month away. The United States has now named its teams for Eventing, Dressage, and Para Dressage. Chef’ d’Equipe Robert Ridland has yet to narrow down his shortlist of show jumpers. They have one final weekend to put on their best performances for the selection committee. Since this weekend is the 4th of July, there’s no better way to celebrate than by watching American riders contend for a coveted spot on the team at the various observation events happening in Europe.

The United States Dressage team will be Adrienne Lyle, Steffen Peters, Sabine Schut-Kery, and Nick Wagman, while Boyd Martin, Liz Halliday-Sharp, Phillip Dutton, and Doug Payne will represent the United States on the Eventing Team in Tokyo. The Para Dressage Paralympic Team will consist of Beatrice De Lavalette, Rebecca Hart, Kate Shoemaker, and Roxanne Trunnell. The show jumping team is the final team to be selected to represent the United States in 2021.

Spend your holiday weekend cheering on the U.S. show jumpers from afar as they compete at the following international competitions.

CHIO Rotterdam

In the Netherlands, CHIO Rotterdam is underway with the FEI Jumping Nations Cup on Friday, July 2, which can now be streamed on demand on FEI TV and ClipMyHorseTV. McLain Ward, Beezie Madden, Adrienne Sternlicht, and Lucy Deslauriers jumped for the U.S., landing them in seventh place. All other jumping classes at CHIO Rotterdam can be viewed on Horse & Country’s streaming platform, H&C+. On Independence Day, watch the Longines Grand Prix of Rotterdam CSI5*. U.S. riders will compete individually for the title and potentially a spot on the Olympic team.

The Royal Windsor Horse Show

Happening simultaneously is the prestigious Royal Windsor Horse Show in the U.K. Here, U.S. riders Kent Farrington, Laura Kraut, Brian Moggre, and Jessica Springsteen are contending for a spot on the team. The feature event will take place on the 4th, so grab your patriotic snacks and tune in while you celebrate. The entire event can be streamed for free on the Royal Windsor website and on demand via ClipMyHorseTV, plus Facebook Live for select classes. H&C+ will also be streaming a replay the €500,000 Rolex Grand Prix on Sunday, July 11, if you miss the live event.

Ones to Watch

Though all shortlisted riders have incredible accolades to their names, some have been on fire in recent events. 19-year-old Brian Moggre is fresh off a win with Balou du Reventon in the Sopot Grand Prix CSI5* in Poland. Teammate Lucy Deslauriers finished second, just behind Moggre, with Hester. Kent Farrington and Gazelle recently topped the Hubside Grand Prix CSI5* with a blazing fast jump-off. Jessica Springsteen took home the win the week prior in the Hubside Grand Prix CSI4* with RMF Tinkerbell.

McLain Ward was named the Leading Rider at Knokke Hippique CSI5* last week after showing incredible consistency across the entire event. He also snagged a win with HH Azur in the Old Salem Farm Grand Prix CSI3* and jumped a double-clear for the U.S. in the Nations Cup of Rome with Contagious. Laura Kraut had a stellar performance at LGCT Valkenswaard, taking the win in the Global Champions League of Valkenswaard. She also recently took home an impressive second place in the Grand Prix of Rome CSI5*.

It will, no doubt, be a tough choice for show jumping Chef d’Equipe Robert Ridland as he watches the top U.S. show jumpers put forth their final effort in these competitions this weekend. Grab your watermelon, crank up the grill, and get ready to watch some incredible international show jumping. It is sure to be a preview of the excitement to come in Tokyo in a few short weeks.

Five Alternative Fitness Ideas for Riders

5 Alternative Fitness Routines for Riders

Five Alternative Fitness Ideas for Riders

Anyone who has ridden a sport horse can make the powerful argument that what we do is, in fact, a sport. We laugh off those who say the horse does all the work because we truly know what a full-body workout it can be and the strength and conditioning required to execute the sport successfully.

But even the fittest of riders need to complement their riding with other forms of exercise. Football players do yoga to keep them balanced and focused. Why shouldn’t riders work on outside exercises that aid them in their riding? Many riders already know their preferred workout method, but if you’re not sure where to start, here are some ideas to expand your fitness routine outside of the saddle.

1. Pilates

Known for targeting specific muscles and utilizing smaller movements in order to strengthen the whole body, Pilates can be a great workout option for riders looking to gain strength all over. Small, repetitive movements can help solidify muscle memory and help stabilize your muscles to be a stronger and steadier rider. Many Pilates studios are offering online classes. You can also find outdoor pop-up classes near you that foster social distancing and follow COVID-19 safety protocols.

2. HIIT

Any hunter/jumper rider knows the feeling of exiting the show ring completely winded, after a very intense, but short, two-minute workout. It’s hard to build endurance for those high-intensity moments since we can’t really replicate them outside of a show environment. That’s where High Intensity Interval Training can be your best friend (or worst enemy, depending on your workout style). Many gyms and trainers are offering virtual HIIT classes that help athletes get their heart rate up, recover, and repeat. These exercises feel like a ton of work. But they will increase your fitness level to a point where those jumping rounds will feel like light work.

3. Yoga

Though the exercises in yoga don’t translate directly to what you do when riding, the benefits of yoga are evident in many aspects of the sport. Riding is a mental sport, and being strong mentally is often equally as important as being strong physically. Yoga helps to center your focus, relax your body, and prepare you to take on challenges that lie ahead. It also focuses on strength and stretching, leaving you more nimble and easing any pain or tension that may keep you from performing your best. Yoga can improve your balance as a rider, as well, keeping you centered during tough situations. Horses also benefit from balanced riders, helping to resolve any imbalances the horses may have themselves.

4. Cycling

We all know the value of a strong leg and solid core for helping your horse effectively use its hind end and jump clear rounds. Cycling is an excellent exercise to help strengthen your leg muscles and engage your core at the same time. Because it’s such a high-intensity workout, cycling is a great way to get your cardio in. This will also help to increase your endurance in the saddle. Though cycling studios are mostly closed due to COVID-19, there are many ways to get stationary bikes set up in your own home, or you can buy a street bike that you can ride (safely, of course) through the hills of your city or town. Pro tip: after an intense cycling session, practice stretching deeply down through your heels with your feet in the “stirrups.” This will loosen your calf muscles and help you keep your heels stretched down next time you sit in the (real) saddle.

5. A personal fitness trainer

Doing the same workout every day or not knowing what workouts are best for your goals are common issues for athletes working without supervision. Personal fitness trainers are now more accessible than ever, so if you have specific goals that you’re not sure how to achieve, look into working with an expert. It doesn’t have to be a long-term commitment; many trainers will teach you work-out circuits to implement on your own, after learning how to do them properly and safely. Though personal trainers are on the more expensive end of workout options, their expertise can be priceless. So if overall fitness is an ultimate goal of yours, do some research about personal fitness trainers that have experience in training equestrian athletes.

 

Have questions about utilizing BarnManager or want to give it a try for yourself? Request a live demo here!

BarnManager is designed to be a part of your team, with the compatibility and credentials necessary to improve communication, simplify the management of horses, and get you out of the office, off the phone calls, and into the barn with the horses you care about! Click here to get a free demo and find out more!

What’s in Their Ring Bags? With Show Jumpers Martin Fuchs and Paris Sellon

Whether it’s used by the rider, the groom, or both, a ring bag full of show necessities is one thing that nearly all show jumping riders have in common. What varies though, is what riders and grooms keep in those ring bags.

Martin Fuchs

In the case of top show jumpers (and equestrian power couple) Paris Sellon and Martin Fuchs, their bag contents are strictly practical; while Martin may be the number-two ranked show jumper in the world, you won’t necessarily find the secret to his great success in his ring bag – but you will find a few of the vital tools that he uses on his way to that success!

Here’s a look at what Paris and Martin don’t go to the ring without.

Paris Sellon. Photo by Jump Media

Gloves and more gloves – Both Martin and Paris keep gloves in their bags, but Paris may have Martin beat on the number of pairs of gloves.

“I usually have about five pairs of gloves because sometimes I can misplace them,” said Paris, who rides in uvex as her glove of choice.

Three pairs of spurs a piece – “I like the wheeled spurs, so I have them in three different sizes,” said Martin of the three spur options you’ll find in his bag.

And while Paris also carries three different choices of spurs in her ring bag, her selections are different.

“I have really small ones that I use for Cassandra,” said Paris of the 12-year-old Swedish Warmblood mare that has been one of her top horses. “I have a pair that look bigger, but they’re actually nice and definitely not sharp, and I have something kind of in between.”

The shared necessities – A helmet, crop, and a towel are common-place among most rider ring bags – and Martin and Paris’s are no exception.

That’s where Martin’s bag list ends, as he elects to keep his uvex bag lightweight, but Paris has a few extra essentials!

The extras – “You never know what might come up,” said Paris. “I have a wrench in case I need studs, and I also have some tape for the horses’ feet in case they need coverage if they get a small cut or anything.”

Paris also carries boot polish, a sticky spray (similar to this one), extra hairnets, and Neutrogena Sport Face sunscreen.

What riders or grooms would you most like to hear from regarding what’s in their ring bag? Drop your suggestions in the comments, and we’ll do our best to have them featured here!

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